GET THE BEST OF ERIC VAN ARO WITH HIS NEW ALBUM “FROM THE BEGINNING AND MORE”

by Andrew Braith              Thursday, 14 December 2017

 https://ericvanaro.hearnow.com/from-the-beginning-and-moreFINAL Beginning

Eric van Aro has just released a new album “From the beginning and more”.  It can be seen as an anthology spanning the past 20 years of his recording career, or more commonly known as a ‘greatest hits’ or ‘best of’ compilation.

Eric’s decorated career as a musician reaches back over 4 decades. Well versed in multi genres, he carved his way and settled his identity primarily as a jazz vocalist.

“From The Beginning and more”, released by the ERAKI label, boasts 17 tracks of Eric’s best material; some of which are previously unreleased songs, and also an additional two new releases, never heard before.

Here’s a quick look at some of the stylistic versatile tracks:

  1. A touching folk ballad “Until It’s time For You To Go”- The first recording of Eric accompanying himself on the guitar.
  2. The swinging “Rhythm In My Nursery Rhymes”, with Caterina Valente on guitar and the late Silvio Francesco on clarinet.
  3. A jazzy influenced, “Put the Weight on My Shoulder”, with the soulful trumpet of Franco Ambrosetti
  4. A Latin jazz version of “the Christmas song” https://youtu.be/RQJfsHuCRFw with the dynamic Iguazu acoustic trio
  5. A rocking version of David Bowie’s “This Is Not America”.
  6. “From the Beginning”: https://youtu.be/1clRKObUfjA

 

Plus three, energy filled EDM remixes of Eric’s dance music hits. –

Eric recently commented about this album:

“I’m a lucky guy who gets to sing some really exquisite songs. Listening to them now proves me right and serving them was absolute pure joy. I must admit that to my ears today I do sound half as bad as I thought back then”.

Throughout the years Eric van Aro has seen a great response by top music critics, including the likes of Don Heckmann who said: “The combination of high quality vocalizing, stylistic versatility and stellar musical setting clearly identify Eric van Aro as one of the current music world’s most appealing male vocalists”.

About Eric van Aro:

Singer, songwriter and producer Eric van Aro is a highly notable European talent who has carved out quite a niche’ for himself in the jazz vocal genre and has experimented successfully with a deluge of other artistic and musical genres. With 5 solo albums under his belt, and 2 Albums with THE EGH PROJECT  (both of whom made it to the top 10 worldwide EDM charts) Eric van Aro successfully continues to surprise audiences with consummate musical versatility.

The album is available on iTunes, Tidal, Amazon, Spotify, and all other major online music distribution portals worldwide.

“… from the Beginning and more” COMING SOON

Eric van Aro’s  “… from the Beginning and more” is an anthology spanning the past 20 years of his recording career. His private music vault holds all the master tapes he’s recorded for the past 2 decades. Now, he’s sharing 17 songs which include 2 brand new recordings, previously unreleased tracks, alternative versions and EDM remixes.

Highlights include:  The touching ballad Until it’s time for you to go the first recording of Eric accompanying himself on the guitar, the jazzy Rhythm in my nursery rhymes with Caterina Valente on guitar and the late Silvio Franceso on clarinet, Put the weight on my shoulder with the soulful trumpet of Franco Ambrosetti, the Latin version of The Christmas Song with the dynamic Iguazu acoustic trio and a live version of the swinging Miles Blowin.

Reflecting on the album, Eric noted, “I’m a lucky guy who gets to sing some really exquisite songs. Listening to them now proves me right… serving them was absolute pure joy.

The words of renowned music critic Don Hekmann describe the album perfectly: The combination of high quality vocalizing, stylistic versatility and stellar musical setting clearly identify Eric van Aro as one of the current music world’s most appealing male vocalists!

 

FINAL Beginning

Our culture loves music. Too bad our economy doesn’t value it.

The digital world has a downside, too.

By T Bone Burnett December 18, 2015

T Bone Burnett is an award-winning singer, songwriter and producer, whose numerous recognitions include 13 Grammy awards, an Oscar and a Golden Globe. He is a member of the Content Creators Coalition’s Advisory Board.
Music runs through America’s soul and makes us who we are — as individuals, as communities, as a nation.

It fuels all the other creative arts, as I have learned working on music-infused films such as “O Brother, Where Art Thou?” and television shows such as “True Detective.”

And it has driven the incredible boom in digital media that seems destined to define our age. Facts don’t lie — musical artists blanket the lists of “top most followed” on Facebook and Twitter, and “always-with-us” access to music is a big part of why smartphones and mobile broadband are the fastest-spreading technologies in human history.

But this brave new digital world has a dark side, too — and it is the responsibility of everyone who loves and cares about music to acknowledge and deal with this uncomfortable truth.

Too much of the emotional, cultural and economic value that music creates is simply lost now, slipping through the digital cracks in some cases, outright hijacked by bad actors and online parasites in others.

Artists, fans and responsible music and technology businesses alike all know this. When my friend Taylor Swift spoke up for the value of our work and the righteous claim of all artists to be paid for what they do, she was celebrated and applauded — not just by her colleagues, but also by teenagers who care about the people who create the music that means something to them and businesses such as Apple that fundamentally want to do what’s right.

How bad is the problem? Consider this: In 2014, sales from vinyl records made more than all of the ad-supported on-demand streams on services such as YouTube. I’m not running down vinyl — it is still the best-sounding, most durable medium we have for listening to music, by far. But why should a technology most people consider outdated generate more revenue than an Internet service with more than 100 million American users? That’s just wrong.

Just two decades ago, a music superstar was born when her record went gold, selling 500,000 units. Today, experts say it takes 100 million streams to match that kind of success. Even the most relentless year-round touring schedule or advertising licensing deals can’t match the income that a hit record once produced.

For small and up-and-coming artists, the income collapse has been even more severe; copies of one-penny royalty checks are rampant on the Internet. These artists are struggling American small businesses, and the deck is stacked against them.

So what’s causing this gap between the value artists create and the price today’s world puts on their work?

Part of it is that the legal mess of U.S. copyright law has anchored royalties for music creators far below fair market value. In some cases, such as satellite radio, the law actually says they can pay below-market rates for music. In others, such as AM/FM radio, it’s even more absurd — when music is played on traditional radio, artists and their labels get paid nothing at all (songwriters receive AM/FM royalties, but no one else does), even though corporate radio chains earn billions selling ads around our work. That’s a legally sanctioned slap in the face to everyone who ever picked up an instrument or sang into a microphone. It is a corrosive economic dust bowl in which giant corporations grow rich on others’ work while music creators try to survive on scraps.

But the problem runs even deeper than that. In the digital marketplace, everyone seems to have found a way to make a living off music except the creators who actually record the songs. Websites put up illegal copies of music — or turn a blind eye while others do — then sell ads micro-targeted at everyone who comes to listen. Eventually, a site may be forced to pull down the unlicensed (and for the artists and labels, completely unpaid) copy, but in the meantime, its owners have cashed in.

For more legitimate sites, creators are pressured to accept a Hobson’s choice between licensing their music at desperately low royalty rates or wading into the legal quicksand and sending thousands or millions of “takedown” notices under a broken and antiquated law called the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.

Fortunately, creators have begun to band together and speak out — the roster of those demanding reform is a who’s who of the music business, from Elvis Costello to Annie Lennox, from REM to Chuck D, and hundreds more. Congress is reviewing the copyright laws, and this time, we will be heard, and there will be no more backroom deals or giveaways. Powerful new legislation called the Fair Play Fair Pay Act is being championed by leaders in both parties who care about music and the people who make it. That would be a vital step forward — a milestone of progress in a debate that has been running in Congress since Frank Sinatra lobbied Paul McCartney, Ella Fitzgerald, Bruce Springsteen and others to join him in fighting for a radio performance right nearly 30 years ago.

Music is an important part of who we are, an indelible record of what we care about and how we live.

And if we let that slip away — whether through legal gridlock, cultural apathy or technological drift — we will have lost something irreplaceable and fundamental to our lives.

(c) 2015 THE WASHINGTON POST – full article at https://www.washingtonpost.com/posteverything/wp/2015/12/18/our-culture-loves-music-too-bad-our-economy-doesnt-value-it/

ENDLESS ROADS will no doubt achieve a high position in Eric Van Aro’s impressive catalog of recordings. Its combination of high quality vocalizing, stylistic versatility and stellar musical settings clearly identify him as one of the current music world’s most appealing male vocalists. It’s time for the Grammy voters to begin to recognize his many talents. – Don Heckman International Review of Music

#erakientertainment #ericvanaro #endlessroads #donheckman #irom

CD Review: Eric Van Aro’s “Endless Roads” By Brian Arsenault

The last time I reviewed an album by this guy in early 2014, I complimented his reclaiming stellar jazz singing for the guys in the face of so many fine current female jazz singers.

This time, withEndless Roads, Eric Van Aro has reestablished the stripped down rock/pop sound amidst an avalanche of overdubbed, over-produced, echo chambered, synthetic slop so dominant today. (We won’t name the purveyors as they know who they are; unshaken TV commercials abound for their concert tours; Good Morning America appearances before overexcited pre-teens. You know the drill.)

Eric Van Aro

Eric himself writes that he has “been taught that the musical roads one can and should take are endless . . .” He may need to be careful, though, as the musical world has long since shown an obnoxious need to characterize artists and their art forms, neat little boxes to keep our tastes in without a lot of thought.

Eric, though, can find room for works by Pat Metheny, Laura Nyro, Randy Newman, Jimmy Page/Robert Plant, Bruno Mars and himself in the same album. Really.

Maybe the bravest piece is Mars’ “Just the Way You Are.” Reworking a big hit by a pop giant is to walk on the edge of unacceptable, as the original version is tucked so deeply into our musical consciousness. Singing along with the car radio and such. Eric pulls it off anyway by tipping his hat to the hit while singing it in his raspier, deeper way.

Eric Van Aro

The lesser known Zep piece “Friends” moves effortlessly from bluesy at the start to jazzy at the end.

“This Is Not America” opens the album and sets the rocking tone with Max Elli’s slick rock guitar opening. Elli is a strength throughout the album, weaving in, under and around Van Aro’s vocals as if they had played together for years. In actuality, they seem to have met musically on Endless Roads.

Eric’s artistic generosity means this could almost have been billed as Elli’s album with Eric providing vocals, rather like the long ago days of Jeff Beck with Rod Stewart.

He notes that on this album he “really tried to let the producer in me stay at home and let myself by guided by my producer and my musicians.”

Kudos to Giordano Colombo for his production. As noted, a clean, crisp, basic sound is quite rare in these days of dubbing to the max.

Drummer Giordano Colombo is solid throughout and really breaks out on “Stratus.” If there’s such a thing as rock scat singing, Eric shows it off here.

Nyro’s “And When I Die”, recorded memorably by Blood Sweat & Tears, adds a little country flavor and Randy Newman’s “I Think It’s Going to Rain Today” has just a dash of Van Morrison flavor in Eric’s vocal.

The album closes with Van Aro’s co-written “One Life One Song” and as an earlier song notes: “. . . that’s the way to treat a friend.”

The friend in this case being any listener.

Endless Roads will be released on September 17.

* * * * * * *

https://irom.wordpress.com/2015/09/01/cd-review-eric-van-aros-endless-roads/

(c)(p) 2015 The International Review of Music

#ericvanaro #endlessroads #brianarsenault #brunomars #jimmypage #lauranyro #ledzeppelin #patmetheny #randynewman #robertplant